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In May, Governor Cellucci signed into law "An Act to Protect Children and Families From Harmful Pesticides". The Act, which is being implemented by the Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, affects all private and public schools, day care centers and school age child care programs. The major components of the Act to be aware of are:
    as of November 1, 2000
    (1) Pesticides shall not be applied indoors while children are on the property, except for anti-microbial pesticides such as bleach; rodenticides placed in tamper resistant baits; insecticidal baits; ready-to-use dusts, gels, or powder formulations; and certain lower risk pesticides and pesticides classified as exempt materials under 40 CFR 152.25 (also known as the 25B list which includes garlic, mint oil and citric acid).

    Until November 1, 2001 other pesticides can be applied indoors when children are NOT present on the property.

    (2) Pesticides shall not be applied on the outdoor property of a school, day care center or school age child care program while children are located in, on, or adjacent to the area of the pesticide application.

    (3) All parents, staff and children will have to be provided with standard written notification of any pesticide application that is made outdoors on the property. The notification will also have to be posted in a common area. The information to be contained in the standard written notification will be obtained from the licensed pesticide applicator who performs the work.
    [NOTE: While the act does not require this notification be made for indoor applications of pesticides, the Department of Food and Agriculture recommends that the notification requirements are followed for all indoor pesticide applications except in the case of anti-microbial pesticides such as bleach; rodenticides placed in tamper resistant baits; insecticidal baits; ready-to-use dusts, gels, or powder formulations; and certain lower risk pesticides and pesticides classified as exempt materials under 40 CFR 152.25 (also known as the 25B list which includes garlic, mint oil and citric acid) .

  • as of November 1, 2001

    (1) An Integrated Pest Management Plan must be developed by all schools, daycare centers and school age child care programs. Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, is an approach to pest control that relies on a combination of common sense practices, not just pesticides, for preventing and controlling pests.

    The Department of Food and Agriculture and the University of Massachusetts will conduct a comprehensive outreach and education program for schools in Winter, 2001. More information will be made available over the coming months and we will keep you updated of developments through our newsletter.
Children's Protection Act of 2000
Brief Overview